From Eskimo Director Caleb Slain comes the critically acclaimed branded documentary Frequencies, following an unorthodox team of 20-somethings as they navigate the challenges of composing music for international gaming phenomenon League of Legends. At already 360,000 views, the documentary is not only a testament to the level of enthusiasm within the gaming community and a detailed, raw behind-the-curtain look at developer Riot Games, but also an engrossing story about five young composers driven by their passions.

The film developed from a short documentary into a full-length experience under Slain’s direction, who went to great strides to submerge himself in the massive subculture by playing the League of Legends game daily to better understand its diehard community of 27 million active daily players. He also personally led every aspect of production including writing, visual development, working hands on with the cinematographer, editing, titling, music score, and more.

In following Christian, a League of Legends composer and former German punk rocker, the film expands beyond niche appeal and focuses on the passionate individuals struggling with doubts, deadlines, and the sticky spirit of creative collaboration. In showcasing these characters, Slain highlights the real labor and heart that goes into composing the music for one of the world’s most popular games.

Through intimately framed interviews and long, flowing shots and explorations, the documentary unpacks the exhaustive creative process including collaborations with rock stars, world-class orchestras, dark hallways, and late nights, all culminating in a musical theme and video for Amumu, one of the game’s most popular characters. It’s a relatable struggle that Slain believes to be central to the unifying themes of Frequencies.

“I think people tend to have this romanticized notion of great music or great art being made by some person locked in a room with a clear idea of what they’re doing, but that’s rarely how it goes down. Most of the artists I know are more dependent on their peers and confidants,” explains Slain. “ Also, the soul of a project is something you have to simultaneously author and discover along the way. Or spend years of your life trying. It was important that the film helped demystify this creative process which I feel is normally safeguarded by tidy behind-the-scenes videos and canned interviews. Hopefully it helps young people or people who’ve had their creativity discouraged to see that failure and doubt are just toll booths.”

To view the full-length film Frequencies, click here.