The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) will put James Neihouse, ASC in the spotlight to discuss his experience making the IMAX film A Beautiful Planet. The panel, moderated by journalist David Heuring, is part of the Creative Master Series at The National Associations of Broadcasters (NAB) show in Las Vegas. It will be held on Monday, April 18 from 11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. in room S220 at the convention center. Neihouse will reveal his multi-year preparations and last-minute adaptations for this IMAX-NASA collaboration, which will be released exclusively in IMAX and IMAX 3D theaters beginning April 29.

Narrated by Academy Award®-winning actress Jennifer Lawrence and directed by Toni Myers, A Beautiful Planet is a breathtaking portrait of Earth from space, providing a unique perspective and increased understanding of the planet and galaxy as never seen before. Made in cooperation with NASA, the film features stunning footage of Earth - and the effects humanity has had on it over time - captured by the astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

A veteran of large-format films, Neihouse has trained a number of astronauts to shoot in space, including those involved in the unforgettable Hubble 3D in 2010. On A Beautiful Planet, Neihouse was again responsible for choosing all the equipment and preparing the astronauts to photograph Earth’s natural beauty and the electric intensity of human expansion. As part of the discussion, Neihouse will divulge his thought process from conception to execution, including his earthbound adaptations when the shuttle originally slated to bring the images home became inoperable.

Neihouse worked on his first IMAX film, directed by Graeme Ferguson, one of the co-founders of IMAX, soon after graduating from the Brooks Institute of Photography. That project, Ocean, was the first underwater film made in the format. Since that time Neihouse has gone on to work on 30-plus IMAX and other large-format films. Neihouse's first credit as director of photography was on The Eruption of Mount St. Helens, the first IMAX film to be nominated for an Academy Award®.

Neihouse has contributed to some of the most successful giant-screen films. His credits include The Dream Is Alive, Space Station 3D, HUBBLE 3D, and Ocean Oasis, to name a few. His work has garnered many awards and accolades, including two Giant Screen Cinema Association Achievement Awards for Best Cinematography, and a Kodak Vision Award. He is a member of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, cinematographers branch, and became a member of the ASC last year.

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About the American Society of Cinematographers
The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the art of filmmaking. Since its charter in 1919, the ASC has been committed to educating aspiring filmmakers and others about the art and craft of cinematography. For additional information about the ASC visit

Now in its 97th year, American Cinematographer is the flagship publication of the American Society of Cinematographers and one of the entertainment industry’s oldest monthly print journals. Its mission is to serve filmmakers by exploring the artistic thought processes of the film industry's most innovative and talented directors of photography, and explaining the technical means by which they realize their creative visions, whether on film, video, or with computers. In fulfilling those goals, the magazine seeks to keep readers abreast of advancements in all facets of motion-picture imaging technology — the tools cinematographers use to ply their trade — and to inform them of visually extraordinary productions, including feature films, television shows, commercials and music videos.

For more information, visit the magazine’s website,