Sunday, January 21, 2018
  • Sunday, Sep. 17, 2017
Marquee Emmy Winners: "The Handmaid's Tale," "Veep," "SNL," "Big Little Lies"
Elisabeth Moss accepts the award for outstanding lead actress in a drama series for "The Handmaid's Tale" at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017, at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
  • LOS ANGELES (AP)
  • --

The dystopian vision of "The Handmaid's Tale," the deeply cynical Washington comedy "Veep" and the ever-topical "Saturday Night Live" won top series honors Sunday in an Emmy Awards ceremony that took almost nonstop aim at President Donald Trump in awards and speeches.

"Go home, get to work, we have a lot of things to fight for," producer Bruce Miller said in accepting the best drama trophy for "A Handmaid's Tale," which also won best drama writing (Bruce Miller) and directing (Reed Morano) awards and a best actress trophy for Elisabeth Moss. A beaming Margaret Atwood, the Canadian author whose 1985 novel is the show's source, was onstage.

Sterling K. Brown, whose role in "This Is Us" earned him the top drama series actor trophy, paid tribute to the last African-American man to win in the category, Andre Braugher in 1998 for his role as a police detective in "Homicide: Life on the Street."

"Nineteen years ago, Detective Frank Pemberton held this joint," Brown, hoisting his Emmy and calling it his "supreme honor" to follow Braugher. He was good-natured as the orchestra cut into his speech, but it seemed a glaring misstep on a night in which the TV academy reveled in signs of the industry's increasing diversity.

Earlier, Nicole Kidman spoke uninterrupted for 2 minutes and 45 seconds, while Brown got 1 minute, 58 seconds, before he was played off, a significant difference given the short time winners get to say their piece.

Moss captured her first Emmy and thanked her mother in a speech that was peppered with expletives, while Ann Dowd won supporting actress honors for "A Handmaid's Tale."

Donald Glover won the best comedy actor for "Atlanta," which he created and which carries his distinctive voice, while Julia Louis-Dreyfus was honored for a sixth time for her role as a self-absorbed politician in "Veep," named best comedy for the third time.

"I want to thank Trump for making black people No. 1 on the most oppressed list. He's the reason I'm probably up here," Glover said, acknowledging the entertainment industry's and the Emmys' increased tilt toward the nonstop political under Trump. He also won a directing trophy for his FX Networks show.

Combined with Emmys that Louis-Dreyfus has won for "Seinfeld" and "New Adventures of Old Christine," her latest trophy tied her with Cloris Leachman as the most-winning Emmy performer ever.

Host Stephen Colbert's song-and-dance opening — with help from Chance the Rapper — included the song "Everything Is Better on TV," which, among other Trump digs, mentioned his alleged ties to Russia and included the lyric "even treason is better on TV."

The ceremony was also smartly free-wheeling under Colbert's direction, including a taped bit in which the nude comedian — carefully shown seated and from the back — was being "reprogrammed" by "Westworld" star and nominee Jeffrey Wright to correct a glitch in the host mechanism.

"Saturday Night Live" triumphed for a season of skewering Trump.

"I remember the first time we won this award," creator Lorne Michaels said in accepting the show's trophy for best variety sketch series. "It was after the first season in 1976. I remember thinking ... this was the high point," and there would never be "another season as crazy, as unpredictable, as frightening, as exhausting or as exhilarating. Turns out I was wrong."

The trophies for best supporting comedy acting went to Kate McKinnon, who played Hillary Clinton on "SNL," and Alec Baldwin for his Trump portrayal on the NBC show.

McKinnon thanked Clinton for her "grace and grit." Baldwin spoke directly to Trump, who has complained in the past that he was cheated out of a trophy for hosting "Celebrity Apprentice": "I suppose I should say, 'At long last, Mr. President, here is your Emmy.'"

Melissa McCarthy was honored at last weekend's creative arts Emmys as best guest actress for her "SNL" work, including portraying Sean Spicer. The former White House press secretary made a surprise Emmys appearance, wheeling in his own podium.

"This will be the largest audience to witness an Emmys, period. Both in person and around the world," Spicer shouted with authority, echoing his claim that Trump's inauguration crowd was the biggest ever and evoking McCarthy's manic portrayal of him.

John Lithgow, who received the best supporting drama actor for his role as British leader Winston Churchill in "The Crown," took a more diplomatic approach to political commentary.

"Most of all I have to thank Winston Churchill. In these crazy times, his life, even as an old man, reminds us what courage and leadership in government really looks like," Lithgow said.

Many celebrities wore blue ribbons to support the American Civil Liberties Union, which is seeking to shed light on the plight of young immigrants facing the potential of being deported.

In a sign of the dramatically changed TV landscape, premium cable was joined by streaming services to dominate traditional broadcast networks with winners including Hulu's "Handmaid's Tale," Netflix's TV movie "Black Mirror: San Junipero" and HBO's "Big Little Lies."

HBO claimed a leading 29 awards based on the combined totals from Sunday and last week's creative arts awards, followed by Netflix with 20, NBC with 15, Hulu with 10, ABC with seven and FX Networks with six.

NBC's uplifting family drama "This Is Us" missed its shot at being the first network drama to win since Fox's "24" in 2006, but the network's "SNL" won a leading nine awards among programs.

"Big Little Lies" won the limited series award, with Kidman taking the lead actress award and supporting honors going to her castmates Alexander Skarsgard and Laura Dern.

"More great roles for women, please," said Kidman as she and her fellow executive producer and co-star Reese Witherspoon accepted the miniseries' award.

Riz Ahmed was honored as best limited series actor for "The Night Of."

Lena Waithe became the first African-American woman to win an Emmy for comedy series writing, for "Master of None," sharing the award with series co-creator Aziz Ansari, who is of Indian heritage.

"The things that make us different, those are superpowers," Waithe said. "Thank you for embracing a little Indian boy from South Carolina and a little queer black girl from the south side of Chicago," she said, basking in a standing ovation from the theater audience.

TV academy President and CEO Hayma Washington paid tribute to TV's increasing diversity. That was reflected in the record number of African-American continuing series acting nominees, but Latinos were overlooked and Ansari was the only Asian-American contender.

"The Voice" won the reality competition category. "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver" won the award for best variety talk series writing and then the variety show prize itself, prompting also-rans Colbert and Jimmy Kimmel to jokingly raise a glass to each other and speculate whether the wrong name was announced.

The "In Memorian" segment had several notable exclusions, including Dick Gregory and Harry Dean Stanton.

Final tally
Counting last weekend's Creative Arts Emmys, HBO led all networks with a total of 29 wins followed by Netflix with 20, NBC with 15, Hulu with 10, AB wth seven, FX Networks with six, FOX with five, Adult Swim and CBS with four apiece, A&E and VH1 with three each, and Amazon, BBC America, ESPN and National Geograhic with two apiece. Garnering one Emmy each were AMC, Cartoon Network, CNN, Comedy Central, Disney XD, Samsung/Oculus, Showtime, TBS, Viceland and Vimeo.

"Saturday Night Live" topped the field of shows winning multiple awards with nine Emmys. "Big Little Lies" and "The Handmaid's Tale" won eight apiece. Taking five each were "Stranger Things," "The NIght Of," "Veep" and "Westworld." Coming in with four Emmys apiece were "13th," "Last Week Tonight With John Oliver" and "Samurai Jack."  Scoring three Emmys each were "Hairspray Live!," "RuPaul's Drag Race," and "The Crown." And winning two Emmys apiece were: "Atlanta," "Black Mirror: Junipero," "Born This Way," "Dancing With The Stars," "Feue: Bette and Joan," "Master Of None," "O.J.: Made In America," "Planet Earth II," "The Beatles: Eight Days A Week--The Touring Years," and "This Is Us."

Here's a rundown of tonight's Emmy winners:

Outstanding Directing For A Comedy Series
Atlanta • B.A.N. • FX Networks • FX Productions Donald Glover, Directed by

Outstanding Directing For A Drama Series
The Handmaid’s Tale • Offred (Pilot) • Hulu • MGM , Hulu, The Littlefield Company, White Oak Pictures, Daniel Wilson Productions Reed Morano, Directed by

Outstanding Directing For A Limited Series, Movie Or Dramatic Special
Big Little Lies • HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with David E. Kelley Productions, Pacific Standard and Blossom Films Jean-Marc Vallée, Directed by

Outstanding Directing For A Variety Series
Saturday Night Live • Host : Jimmy Fallon • NBC • SNL Studios in association with Universal Television and Broadway Video Don Roy King, Directed by

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series
Atlanta • FX Networks • FX Productions
Donald Glover as Earn Marks

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series
This Is Us • NBC • 20th Century Fox Television
Sterling K. Brown as Randall Pearson

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Limited Series Or Movie
The Night Of • HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with BBC, Bad Wolf Productions and Film Rites
Riz Ahmed as Nasir “Naz” Khan

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series
Veep • HBO • HBO Entertainment
Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series
The Handmaid’s Tale • Hulu • MGM , Hulu, The Littlefield Company, White Oak Pictures, Daniel Wilson Productions
Elisabeth Moss as Offred

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Limited Series Or Movie
Big Little Lies • HBO • HBO Entertainment in association wit h David E. Kelley Productions, Pacific St andard and Blossom Films
Nicole Kidman as Celeste Wright

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Comedy Series
Saturday Night Live • NBC • SNL Studios in association with Universal Television and Broadway Video
Alec Baldwin as Donald Trump

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Drama Series
The Crown • Netflix • Left Bank Pictures in association with Sony Pictures Television
John Lithgow as Winston Churchill

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Limited Series Or Movie
Big Little Lies • HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with David E. Kelley Productions, Pacific Standard and Blossom Films
Alexander Skarsgård as Perry Wright

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series
Saturday Night Live • NBC • SNL Studios in association with Universal Television and Broadway Video
Kate McKinnon as Various Characters

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Drama Series
The Handmaid’s Tale • Hulu • MGM , Hulu, The Littlefield Company, White Oak Pictures, Daniel Wilson Productions
Ann Dowd as Aunt Lydia

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Limited Series Or Movie
Big Little Lies • HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with David E. Kelley Productions, Pacific St andard and Blossom Films
Laura Dern as Renata Klein

Outstanding Comedy Series
Veep • HBO • HBO Entertainment

Outstanding Drama Series
The Handmaid’s Tale
• Hulu • MGM , Hulu, The Littlefield Company, White Oak Pictures, Daniel Wilson Productions

Outstanding Limited Series
Big Little Lies
• HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with David E. Kelley Productions, Pacific Standard and Blossom Films

Outstanding Television Movie
Black Mirror: San Junipero
• Netflix • House of Tomorrow

Outstanding Variety Talk Series
Last Week Tonight With John Oliver
• HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with Sixteen String Jack Productions and Avalon Television

Outstanding Variety Sketch Series
Saturday Night Live
• NBC • SNL Studios in association with Universal Television and Broadway Video

Outstanding Reality Competition Program
The Voice
• NBC • MGM Television, Talpa Media USA, Inc. and Warner Horizon Unscripted Television John De Mol, Executive Producer; Mark Burnett, Executive Producer; Audrey Morrissey, Executive Producer; Jay Bienstock, Executive Producer; Lee Metzger, Executive Producer; Chad Hines, Executive Producer

Outstanding Writing For A Comedy Series
Master Of None
• Thanksgiving • Netflix • Universal Television, Oh Brudder Productions, Alan Yang Productions, Fremulon and 3 Arts Entertainment Aziz Ansari, Written by; Lena Waithe, Written by

Outstanding Writing For A Drama Series
The Handmaid’s Tale
• Offred (Pilot ) • Hulu • MGM , Hulu, The Littlefield Company, White Oak Pictures, Daniel Wilson Productions Bruce Miller, Teleplay by

Outstanding Writing For A Limited Series, Movie Or Dramatic Special
Black Mirror: San Junipero
• Netflix • House of Tomorrow Charlie Brooker, Written by

Outstanding Writing For A Variety Series
Last Week Tonight With John Oliver
• HBO • HBO Entertainment in association with Sixteen String Jack Productions and Avalon Television Kevin Avery, Written by; Tim Carvell, Written by; Josh Gondelman, Written by; Dan Gurewitch, Written by; Geoff Haggerty, Written by; Jeff Maurer, Written by; John Oliver, Written by; Scott Sherman, Written by; Will Tracy, Written by; Jill Twiss, Written by; Juli Weiner, Written by
 

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