Wednesday, October 26, 2016
  • Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2016
On-Location Lensing In L.A. Up Nearly 6% In Q2
Paul Audley, president of FilmL.A.
Features rise, TV slows, commercial production holds steady
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On-location filming in Greater Los Angeles increased 5.8 percent between April and June, 2016 to 9,937 shoot days (SD), according to an update from FilmL.A. Continuing growth in the feature films category, attributable to the California Film & Television Tax Credit Program, helped keep local film crews working. FilmL.A. is a not-for profit organization that serves as the official film office of the City of Los Angeles, the County of Los Angeles and 20 other area jurisdictions.

Local on-location feature production increased 9.7 percent (to 1,309 SD) in the second quarter, thanks to projects filming in California with the aid of the state film incentive. Along with other feature projects, four films retained by the state incentive were in production last quarter, generating 108 SD of filming. Those projects were Battle of the Sexes, Latin Lover, Please Stand By and Why Him.

“We’re delighted to report a second straight quarter of feature growth for Los Angeles, as we’d hoped for and predicted,” said Paul Audley, president of FilmL.A. “We expect these production increases to continue until the state’s incentive reaches full utilization.”

Overall television production posted a 1.4 percent increase (to 4,091 SD) in the second quarter. Among the three big Television subcategories, TV Reality production slipped 8.6 percent (to 1,298 SD), TV comedy production slipped 16.8 percent (to (420 SD), and TV drama production increased 3.8 percent (to 1,042 SD). The biggest growth for television came from TV Pilots, which increased 89.1 percent (to 278 SD), and Web-based TV, which increased 20.6 percent (to 527 SD).

Among all of the production categories tracked by FilmL.A. Research, television is most crucially linked to the availability of state incentives. Approximately 38 percent (or 395 SD) of L.A.’s second quarter TV drama production was incentive-driven, in addition to 15 percent (or 42 SD) for TV pilots.

Commercial production levels held steady with a mere 0.4 percent slip in the second quarter (to 1,243 SD). Local Commercial production levels have been holding steady since 2014.